Te Puia, Hemo Rd PO Box 334
Rotorua 3040, New Zealand.
+64 7 348 9047   info@tepuia.com

Operating Hours:
8am – 5pm Winter (April - September)
9am – 6pm Summer (September – April)

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Tuko Iho | Living Legacy

An exhibition of time-honoured Māori artworks | Living Legacy features more than 80 pieces of art using wood, bone, stone and flax mediums, handcrafted by students and teachers at New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute (NZMACI). The exhibition is supported by an array of other art forms including kapa haka, in situ wood carving and tā moko (Māori tattoo).

In 2011, NZMACI renewed its commitment to the original legislation and philosophy, including its mandate to protect, promote and perpetuate Māori arts, crafts and culture. This renewed focus was followed by a succession of ground-breaking cultural projects including Tuku Iho. Tuku Iho is not only fulfilling its responsibilities under the Act, but is creating and developing relationships with other indigenous groups throughout the world.

In the past three years, Tuku Iho has exhibited in China, Malaysia, Chile and Argentina. The benefits of the exhibition extend beyond cultural engagement, enabling strengthened political relationships between New Zealand and the host countries, the forging of education partnerships and international trade opportunities. Tuku Iho also adds strength, dimension and authenticity to the associated tourism offer; not just at Te Puia, but for Rotorua and New Zealand.

 

Tuku Iho | Legado Vivo Brazil in 50 words

Showcasing over 80 exquisite Māori artworks from the New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute, Tuku Iho takes New Zealand’s indigenous culture and arts to the world. Hosted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil during October 2015, the exhibition is supported by kapa haka performances, wood carving, tā moko (Māori tattoo) and a series of live talks.

 

Tuku Iho | Legado Vivo Brazil in 100 words

Tuku Iho’s a collection of over 80 exquisite Māori artworks crafted in wood, pounamu (greenstone), bone, stone and flax by students and teachers at the New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute (NZMACI).

Hosted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil during October 2015, the exhibition is supported by kapa haka performances, wood carving, tā moko (Māori tattoo) and a series of live talks

Tuku Iho shares Māori culture far and wide, through connecting with people and cultures around the world. The exhibition also serves to deliver NZMACI’s mandate to protect, promote and perpetuate Māori arts and crafts and culture.

 

Tuku Iho | Legado Vivo Brazil in 200 words

Tuku Iho | Legado Vivo Māori (Living Legacy) is a collection of exquisite Māori artworks including works made in wood, pounamu (greenstone), bone, stone and flax. The pieces have been handcrafted by students and teachers at the New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute (NZMACI) based at Te Puia in Rotorua.

Having already shown in Shanghai, Kuching, Penang, Santiago and Buenos Aires over the past few years, Tuku Iho opens in Rio de Janeiro in October 2015, coinciding with the 450th  anniversary of the city’s independence.

Famous landmarks and Olympic venues around Rio will become the backdrop for kapa haka (Māori performance) while the Espaco Tom Jobim at the Rio de Janeiro Botanical Garden will host the exhibition, live carving and moko (tattoo) practitioners.

Tuku Iho provides an opportunity for artists and performers to interact with Brazil’s indigenous peoples, schools, arts communities and exhibition visitors, providing insights about Māori culture and connecting the art to the people it comes from. During their time in Buenos Aires in July 2015, NZMACI made history by becoming the first country to present its indigenous peoples in the Argentinean National Congress, alongside the Wichi;, Coya and Guarani indigenous peoples; none of whom had ever had the opportunity to visit their own congress.

 

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